Sandy Banks Nature Reserve

Once part of Sherwood Forest, this green valley sits in the heart of Bestwood - one of the few wild sites in the City.

Built on sandstone, the grainy soils mean it’s a rare habitat which attracts wildlife not spotted in many other areas. The sandy ground also means there’s a perfect place for insects to bask in sunlight and easily bury somewhere cooler when it gets too hot. Why not go on your own minibeast hunt - see what you can spot?

Sandy Banks is managed by Nottingham City Council.

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Map Key

Nature Reserve

Entry

Woodland Area

Pathway

Road

Bus Stop

Residential Area

Play Area

This map is reproduced from Ordnance Survey material with the permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of the Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office (c) Crown copyright. Unauthorised reproduction infringes Crown copyright and may lead to prosecution or civil proceedings.
Nottingham City Council 100019317. 2011.

What’s happening in Sandy Banks Nature Reserve

Introduction

Introduction

Once part of Sherwood Forest, this green valley sits in the heart of Bestwood - one of the few wild sites in the City.

Built on sandstone, the grainy soils mean it’s a rare habitat which attracts wildlife not spotted in many other areas. The sandy ground also means there’s a perfect place for insects to bask in sunlight and easily bury somewhere cooler when it gets too hot.

Sandy Banks is a Green Flag Award winning site - recognised as one of the UK's great green spaces. The reserve is managed by Nottingham City Council.

There are many entrance points from Bestwood Park estate, and a main pathway through from Oxclose Lane to Beckhampton Road.  The path is well lit and has benches if you fancy a rest!

For more information about Sandy Banks visit the Nottingham City Council webpage

Sandy Banks is managed by Nottingham City Council.

Entrance from Elmbridge

Entrance from Elmbridge

There is an entrance to Sandy Banks just by the Co-op on Beckhampton Road - walk down Elmbridge behind the car park and Sandy Banks is on your right.

Sandy scrapes

Sandy scrapes

Sandy Banks was given its name for the exposed sandstone patches dotted around the reserve, that have been visible for over 20 years.  These unique patches catch the eye as you walk through the site.  Not only are they an attractive feature, but are great for insects to bask and burrow, including beetles and solitary bees.

Hill views

Hill views

Sandy Banks has steep banks at many places across the site, looking down to the centre of the reserve.  Steps will help you navigate the terrain, but stop for a minute at the top to enjoy the view!

 

Image © Keren Young

Sandy Banks Nature Reserve

Lowland dry acid grassland

The underlying sandstone and sandy soil create an unusual habitat that is nationally rare - known as 'lowland dry acid grassland'.

Southern Entrance - Beckhampton Road and Chippenham Road

Southern Entrance - Beckhampton Road and Chippenham Road

The most visible entrance to Sandy Banks is at the southern end of the reserve - you can't miss the stylish metal gates where Beckhampton Road meets Chippenham Road!

Sandy Banks Nature Reserve

Well served by buses

Sandy Banks is on a well served bus route. Both purple and yellow routes both go right past the reserve - look out for purple 88 and yellow 71.

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